Frit-Happens !
June 13, 2021, 11:06:26 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
your ad here
News:
Where are you?? Add yourself to the NEW FHF map here  | On flickr? Join our Frit Happens group: here

VISIT THE WIKI HERE
Get FH Status updates via twitter @FritHappens

 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
Author Topic: Beadcube, SC2 or Hobbyfuser 3?  (Read 4358 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
MelanieO
New Forum Member
*
Posts: 9


« on: May 26, 2015, 06:09:05 AM »

Seems an odd selection.  I would like a kiln that does bead annealing and fusing and maybe enamelling.  Could a little beadcube do all that or should I just go large and get a Hobbyfuser? Alternatively should I plump for a SC2 as a kiln a bit bigger than the Beadcube but not the size of a Hobbyfuser?  If I choose a Beadcube how many beads does it hold? I've read on here as many as 300 but I assume that is just piling them in as a batch anneal.  Isn't there a risk of them all sticking together?

If I go for a Hobbyfuser I know that I will have to batch anneal rather than popping beads into the kiln straight from the flame.  Does that cause problems? 

I'm leaning towards a Kilncare kiln because of the great customer service and my fear that I may need a bit of hand holding to start with.
Logged
Purple Cobwebs
Forum Member
***
Posts: 230


WWW
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2015, 06:18:28 AM »

Must admit, I'd not use a hobbyfuser for beads, but I prefer to pop my beads in the kiln as I go. Less chance of breakage that way.

I use an SC2 for my beads, and can do also small scale fusing/slumping. eg 1 coaster at a time and slump a small beer bottle.

I'm looking to buy a hobbyfuser to do more fusing, but would keep my SC2 for my beads.
Logged

Gaynor
Making beads, cards and jewellery to raise funds for Viva and Dr Hadwens Trust!
www.purplecobwebs.co.uk
Zeldazog
My name's Dawn, I'm an
Administrator
*******
Posts: 1048


I'm free, to do what I want...♪♪♪


« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2015, 06:21:44 AM »

Do you ever make 300 beads in one sitting?  If you want to be able to anneal as you go, think about how many you would normally make.  And as far as I know, whether you anneal as you go or batch anneal, if you put them in the kiln when they're too hot, they might get kiss marks anyway (not a beader so can't say that with any authority)

You'd struggle to do enamelling in a Hobbyfuser - in fact in any top loader.  You need to be able to pop things in and out of the kiln quickly - hard to do with a big lid at 800 centigrade.  Oh, and of course different colours of enamel fire best at different temperatures.  And for different lengths of time.  Ideally you need to be able to peek in regularly to see how its going (I've boiled red enamel, it's not a good look).

Of course, you won't get much more than a single coaster in a Bead cube.

You have to decide what your priority is.  What do you want it for *most*?  Go with that. 

I bought my first kiln 8 years ago, dithered, went for a Caldera, as theoretically that covers more bases - hot enough for ceramics, can have a window option, a bead door option and is four sided heating, so more even than a front opening door for fusing glass.  But in the end, I decided fusing was my priority, and it wasn't for me.

The SC2 covers a lot of things, but I think the Bead cube does too, on a slightly smaller basis.  And with the Bead Cube, you get the reassurance of buying from Kilncare.  Aftersales service is second to none.
Logged

Margram
Temperature's rising
Forum Member
*****
Posts: 698


Glass in pocket


« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2015, 06:33:05 AM »

Just to complicate matters - I noticed this morning that Tuffnells are selling a new style of dual purpose kiln http://www.tuffnellglass.com/contents/en-uk/d33.html#p3863 Pricier, though! Smiley
Logged

anditsinthefish
Forum Member
***
Posts: 138



« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2015, 06:42:29 AM »

I got a SC2 with bead door and window so that I could do the same as you: bead anneal, fuse and enamel.

I must say I have never used it to anneal as I refuse to part with my maxine. I has been absolutely fab to enamel and fuse in.

However, I am now (a year down the line) getting frustrated with the size of it to fuse in. I am now looking at a hobbyfuser 3 for fusing whilst keeping my SC2 for enameling.

Going with what Zeldazog said, decide what your priority is. For me when I bought my SC2, mine was enameling, however now my priority has changed and it is fusing because my work is becoming less and less jewellery and more home wares.

Logged

Sarah xx
Website. Blog. Flickr.
MelanieO
New Forum Member
*
Posts: 9


« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2015, 06:50:17 AM »

Thanks for your replies. I was leaning towards the Beadcube or SC2 when someone said to me that I should get the biggest kiln I can afford.  As my original intention was to get a kiln for bead annealing I think I should focus on that.  I've got a bit swayed recently by looking at all the things you can do with glass fusing. Realistically my focus initially will be on lampwork and small fused glass jewellery, both of which I should be able to do in the Beadcube or SC2. If I later decide I want to do more fusing then I have the space to get something larger (getting a shedio at the end of the garden this summer, I can't wait!). Looks like I now need to decide between a Beadcube and SC2 so at least my selection has narrowed a bit.
Logged
Nicknack
Forum Member
****
Posts: 469

To bead, or not to bead? ..... stupid question!


« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2015, 09:01:32 AM »

I've got an SC2, which I use to anneal my beads and to fuse smaller things.  I can get one coaster and 4 or 5 pendants/earrings in at once (why waste space!), and you can also fuse and slump slightly larger dishes.  I haven't tried enameling in it, as I have a kiln I bought back in the 70s for that, which I've used with the kids at school, so there's spilled enamel on the bottom. I'm not sure I'd like to risk getting spilled enamel in my SC2............

Nick
Logged
anditsinthefish
Forum Member
***
Posts: 138



« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2015, 09:36:29 AM »

I'm not sure I'd like to risk getting spilled enamel in my SC2............

Nick

I got a spare shelf for mine and it is covered in enamel and bits but it stops the inside getting messy Smiley and then I have a nice smooth one for fusing.
Logged

Sarah xx
Website. Blog. Flickr.
Zeldazog
My name's Dawn, I'm an
Administrator
*******
Posts: 1048


I'm free, to do what I want...♪♪♪


« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2015, 10:09:33 AM »

Thanks for your replies. I was leaning towards the Beadcube or SC2 when someone said to me that I should get the biggest kiln I can afford.

That's a quote I read often, and actually, I think it should be "get the biggest kiln you can afford for the purpose you want it for".  Yes, I'd totally agree, I got a Skutt Hot Start Pro, it wasn't long before I wanted bigger.  That said, at the time I was fusing at home, and it was the biggest I could fit in the kitchen.  Once I got my studio space, I went up to a Hobbyfuser - it didn't take long before I thought "hey, that's not big enough!"

However, whilst I think it's a good sentiment, it probably only applies if you're looking for a specific purpose.

All too often I see people who want to "have a go at fusing" go straight out and buy a Hobbyfuser without having taken a class, then spend all their time asking questions and being afraid to fire it because they might ruin a large piece of glass if they get it wrong. 

You can learn lots about fusing in a small kiln, there's bound to be someone not too far willing to rent out kiln space if you want to make something larger - I'd advise a class if you do decide to go for a bit of fusing (of course I would, I teach it Cheesy) - it might seem expensive, but you've only got to bu99er up a couple of large sheets of glass trying it on your own and you've almost spent the same amount as the class would cost (which you would have made and brought something away from anyway)

I'm looking to upgrade, my next kiln will be too big really to consider samples, so I will probably at some point have both a large fusing kiln and a Bead Cube for samples and playing. experimenting
Logged

Zeldazog
My name's Dawn, I'm an
Administrator
*******
Posts: 1048


I'm free, to do what I want...♪♪♪


« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2015, 10:11:13 AM »

And actually, had the Kilncare Bead Cube been around when I did buy my first kiln, that's what I would have got, as I already knew of their reputation and it did (does) everything I wanted to try. 
Logged

Blue Box Studio
Blue sky thinking & a load of hot air
Forum Member
******
Posts: 963


Just give me the coffee and no one gets hurt!


WWW
« Reply #10 on: May 26, 2015, 11:22:06 AM »

Not tried enamelling yet, but bought my SC2 because I knew I would want to try fusing.  I always garage my beads.  I got frustrated with my SC2 only fitting in one coaster at a time, made things seem laborious so looked for a small kiln for fusing and luckily was offered one by a FH'er so now have a Skutt Hot Start.  Anyway, that's my 2 penneth.  I looked at a Bead Cube when I started and decided it was too small and, I thought I understood, no good for fusing?
Logged

Zeldazog
My name's Dawn, I'm an
Administrator
*******
Posts: 1048


I'm free, to do what I want...♪♪♪


« Reply #11 on: May 26, 2015, 12:11:06 PM »

  I looked at a Bead Cube when I started and decided it was too small and, I thought I understood, no good for fusing?

Goes up to 920 deg C - main issue is that with it being a muffle kiln, it may be slightly cooler at the front near the door, but I know some people also have that issue with SC2 anyway.  Less of an issue if using for jewellery pieces though. 
Logged

Pauline
Forum Member
****
Posts: 274


happy happy happy


« Reply #12 on: May 26, 2015, 04:26:59 PM »

I have an SC3 which gives a bit of extra headroom so you can try sightly higher fusing / slumping
with the original solid door I got pretty even heat for 2 shelves of cabs but with the bead door it is definitely cooler in that area so not as good for fusing with the bead door, though I have obtained a piece of ceramic fibre to try bunging the hole with
Logged
MelanieO
New Forum Member
*
Posts: 9


« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2015, 03:45:25 AM »

Thank you for all your replies.  Am I correct in understanding that a kiln with a bead door won't be much good for fusing? If I want to do some fusing am I better off getting a kiln without a bead door and doing batch annealing?

 I'm going on a fused glass jewellery course next month at Creative Glass which will be helpful.  I'm sure that I will want to be able to make cabs as well as annealing beads as I've enjoyed using bought dichroic glass cabs in the silver jewellery I've made.
Logged
anditsinthefish
Forum Member
***
Posts: 138



« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2015, 04:41:18 AM »

Thank you for all your replies.  Am I correct in understanding that a kiln with a bead door won't be much good for fusing? If I want to do some fusing am I better off getting a kiln without a bead door and doing batch annealing?

 I'm going on a fused glass jewellery course next month at Creative Glass which will be helpful.  I'm sure that I will want to be able to make cabs as well as annealing beads as I've enjoyed using bought dichroic glass cabs in the silver jewellery I've made.

My SC2 has a bead door and a window. I have had the very odd firing where things at the front haven't melted quite enough and I just turn it around and re-fire. In my experience the door doesn't affect or prevent you from fusing Smiley
Logged

Sarah xx
Website. Blog. Flickr.
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.037 seconds with 19 queries.