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Author Topic: Is there a particular (or peculiar) way that you’d use this glass?  (Read 2828 times)
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Andy Davies
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« on: November 16, 2014, 06:28:43 AM »


Hi Folks

         This is the load of CoE 100 glass that I’ve been banging on about that I bought from Plowden & Thompson some 12 to 15 years ago.

              DSCF6246 by andy.c.davies@btinternet.com, on Flickr

I never intended to melt it, I was going to use it cold to make a screen but now I’ve got a new torch I can easily melt it but I’ve only just noticed how the glass has been drawn in multiple layers. 

                                                   DSCF8576 by andy.c.davies@btinternet.com, on Flickr

The Pearl White (middle row far left and under the red) have a very discernible inner tube and outer skin of white pigmentation about a clear core. And clearly the other rod have layered striations throughout.
 
I haven’t properly played with this glass yet, and the blessed grass still needs cutting, but I'm guessing that this can lead to some unusual effects as reasonably I'm assuming they won’t blend in unless fully stirred up.

I notice the some of the other colours I have (from P&T) appeared to have a uniform colour throughout their cross section like the Effetre glass I’ve been playing with.

 So the question is . . .  do you use this glass to create curious and unusual patterns or is there some technique that produces ‘solid colour’?

             Some photographic examples might help me and other beginners.

                   Anyway, seeing as though the ‘wet-leaf-picking-up and grass-cutting fairies' seems to be on strike I better get out there  and wreak havoc in the garden. 
     
                                    Thanks for your interest.
   
                                               Kind Regards  . . . Andy

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Andy Davies
helbels
Proudly achieving mediocrity since Sept 2009.
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« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2014, 06:34:11 AM »

Hi Andy

There's nothing particularly special about Plowden and Thompson, it will just be slightly stiffer as it's a lower COE than Effetre.

Those markings in the solid coloured opaque rods will probably disappear when you melt it, I think they are mainly down to the different layers of the glass cooling at different rates when its pulled into cane - sometimes other makes of glass have those striations too. 

With the ones that have a mixture of transparent and clear layers, you will probably get a streaky finish on the finished bead, which is a nice look.

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Magpie
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« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2014, 12:32:01 PM »

As Helen says, streaky. Streaky is good as a base bead and large areas but not so good for small dots and intricate patterns. If you're doing a base bead and want it to look streaky make sure you apply it round and round the bead, if you just add large splodges it will look weird. If you're doing a pressed bead and need a bit more glass to fill the press, again add a streak of it on rather than a blob; unless that's the effect you're looking for.
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BeeBeads
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Still here!


« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2014, 01:13:45 PM »

You've got a lovely stash there, Andy!
I'm sure you'll make something lovely with it all.

Bee
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Trudi
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« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2014, 03:39:20 PM »

Ohh I'll bet that the dual colour ones will look great just made into spacers!
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Andy Davies
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« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2014, 05:54:07 PM »

Thanks all for the feedback.

  I’ve got a bunch of tasks that I’ve got to get out of the way before I can get around to trying out these rods. I'm finding the new alpha torch with the oxy-con much more pleasant and quieter to work with than the Hot-Head but I’ve got a wall to plaster and that blessed grass still needs cutting.

                              Thanks again

                                             Regards  . . . Andy 
 
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Andy Davies
Kalorlo
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Heather Kelly Glass


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« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2014, 03:16:27 PM »

I did a colour test post about some of P&T's 100 coe glass here aaaages ago! http://www.frit-happens.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=20157.0

Your batches and colours are likely to have differences, but it's a little bit of info. (Also, y'know, old beads those).
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Pat from Canvey
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Keep on blowing


« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2014, 04:03:43 AM »

" it's a little bit of info"

Not little at all and a great deal of info I enjoyed reading again so thanks for reminding me about it.
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spexy
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« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2014, 04:46:37 AM »

That was a great write up Heather, I have a load of this glass I bought second hand.

I've noticed that the black plays nicely if you work it in a propane rich flame and then use an oxygen rich flame to get the silver to come out. (I hope I've remember that the right way round if not the opposite will definitely work!)

I've used it successfully for dots on 104 coe. I have some transparent amber which is very saturated.

I haven't noticed anything special about the rest, as Heather said a bit stiffer and takes a bit more melting. I mainly have reds, oranges and yellows and used these to make my Circle of Fire necklace.

I've just remembered that the blue that Heather had so much trouble with also played nicely with a propane rich flame.
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Carefulkate
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« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2014, 05:27:24 AM »

Great info as I also have some I got second hand can I just ask what does "boiling" in regards to glass and what problems does it cause x
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Kalorlo
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Heather Kelly Glass


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« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2014, 02:07:38 PM »

Boiling means getting lots of little bubbles - it means you can end up with little bubbles inside and a pitted surface where they have burst.
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Andy Davies
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« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2014, 02:23:48 PM »

I did a colour test post about some of P&T's 100 coe glass here aaaages ago! http://www.frit-happens.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=20157.0

Your batches and colours are likely to have differences, but it's a little bit of info. (Also, y'know, old beads those).

Thank you for the interesting link.

      Regards  . . . Andy 
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Andy Davies
Carefulkate
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« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2014, 03:33:25 PM »

Thanks of the reply about boiling haven't done it so far but now I know what it is will probably happen x
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