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Bead Press
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Author Topic: Studio Design?  (Read 450 times)
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lampworklover
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« on: March 20, 2017, 02:50:47 PM »

My shed is lovely, although the resident spiders are not! I am in the extremely fortunate position of being able to have a purpose built studio on the back of DH's new garage, the planning permission has now been granted and so I need to think about layout.

If you were to design a studio layout from scratch, what would you do differently from the one you have now? Any tips please?

Thanks.
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Enchanted Cobwebs
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« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2017, 07:26:53 PM »

Glass rods next to where I sit lampworking with the ends facing me, kiln on the other side also facing me and both reachable by rolling on my wheely chair. A seperate area for dipping mandrels and cleaning beads and another clean area for making jewellery. At the moment my dirty area battles for space with my jewellery space. Enjoy!
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lampworklover
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« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2017, 09:11:40 AM »

Thanks!  Yes, the bit I am lacking in the shedio is the jewellery making space, which is currently indoors at a desk. Really looking forward to having everything out there (and bead cleaning, currently in the kitchen and annoying everyone  Cheesy)
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Lynnybobs
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2017, 10:03:07 AM »

Small shelves for brass presses are handy (the ones in IKEA for spice jars are ideal) and cup hooks to hang any bead rollers so you can easily see what you have. I also have a mini drawer unit on my desk for pots/bags of frit stored in the drawers by colour.
My workspace is positioned in a corner and U shaped so I have the torch in the middle, then kiln on one side and the glass rods on the other.
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Lynnybobs
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Shirley
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« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2017, 10:13:32 AM »

More glass storage than you think you need. More electrical points than you think you need. Lots of little drawers for bits and pieces. Somewhere for general non-glassy tools, such as screwdrivers, wrench, other bits.
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lampworklover
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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2017, 11:02:49 AM »

LOL Shirley, I had an interesting discussion with DH about electrical sockets! I think you can never have too many, he disagrees, although I think he has been persuaded.

Lynnybobs, I thought I was the only one with a corner torch station! That's what I have now, and it gives me maximum space between the end of the flame and the wall.
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JanieD
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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2017, 12:13:45 PM »

I also have a corner torch area - I'm so used to it I can't imagine having it anywhere else  Smiley



Jane
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Lynnybobs
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« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2017, 11:53:49 AM »

Me too, but I have a corner shed so it was the most logical place but I find it easier to keep everything at an easy reach - mandrels and glass one'wing' of the bench and kiln and tools on the other.
Also as Tina says also keeps a bit more distance between the flame and the shed walls for safety!
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Lynnybobs
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flame n fuse
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« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2017, 08:57:39 PM »

add good lighting and ventilation to the list (I expect you already have), and I agree that you can't have too many power points. I have kiln, 2 oxycons, 2 anglepoises and extract fan all plugged in (6 items), and I clean and finish beads in the utility room, where I might also be using a tumbler, ultrasonicator, and slow cooker (for silver) and a dremel too.
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lampworklover
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« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2017, 10:31:42 PM »

Yes, ventilation will move from shed, although we are thinking of changing the 'slinky' type ducting for something a bit more rigid. Lighting, I was thinking daylight led striplights, any thoughts?
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flame n fuse
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« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2017, 09:57:42 AM »

I think rigid ducting is meant to be better, I am still on the slinky type. There is a fairly bright top light in my room, but I often find that the close up use of anglepoises is better for me, although they take up room on the table. Lighting options have changed so much with all the new led low voltage types, I am probably several years behind.
Are you going to have some background heating in there? My 'studio' is in the house and I have the central heating radiator on very low, which just keeps the chill off. The torch and the kiln quickly warm the room up when I am working.
Depending on which way your windows face, might you need blinds? my room faces north so no problem with sun.
Sounds like you are going to have a fabulous space!
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lampworklover
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« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2017, 10:02:04 AM »

I am told that I am having underfloor heating, and I'm not arguing with that  Grin! I do tend to get quite cold feet, so it should help with that too.

They are having to dig some ground out, so I will have one window facing south, and one west, both shaded by trees. I think that those heat retaining blinds would make economic sense, can't think what they are called at the moment, brain fog.
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Pauline
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« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2017, 09:49:11 PM »

I think that those heat retaining blinds would make economic sense, can't think what they are called at the moment, brain fog.
I saw some of the concertina type in Ikea on Monday if that is any help
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lampworklover
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« Reply #13 on: March 24, 2017, 08:50:44 AM »

Thanks Pauline, hadn't thought of IKea!

Building plans have now been finished, next job is to actually find a builder.
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Moira HFG
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« Reply #14 on: March 24, 2017, 05:32:27 PM »

I am told that I am having underfloor heating, and I'm not arguing with that  Grin! I do tend to get quite cold feet, so it should help with that too.

That's a really good idea. With a kiln on, I often used to find myself perfectly warm except for my freezing feet! I have a floor-level heater now.

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