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Author Topic: Do I need a grinder?  (Read 1968 times)
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Flowers
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« on: October 29, 2015, 05:43:08 AM »

Hi everyone
I have recently purchased a kiln having been doing fusing for a short while I decided it was time to take the plunge.  Now I am deciding whether to get a Gemini 3 Ringsaw and a grinder but I am not sure whether or not I need both.  Is it necessary to grind cut pieces, how important is it to have a grinder?
Thank you for any advice.
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flame n fuse
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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2015, 05:53:56 AM »

Hi, what sort of shapes are you thinking of doing? If you want to make fancy squiggly shapes then a ringsaw is probably essential, but gentle curves, circles and squares don't require one. Beware of devit which tends to happen on edges cut with a ringsaw when they're not cleaned properly.
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Flowers
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« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2015, 06:07:09 AM »

Hi I would like to cut circles and squiggles and more angular shapes. I will clean the pieces well after  Smiley should you use a circle cutter for cutting circles then or just buy them pre cut?
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Flowers
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« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2015, 06:08:47 AM »

Sorry forgot to add what are your thoughts on using a grinder?
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Nicknack
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To bead, or not to bead? ..... stupid question!


« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2015, 06:13:36 AM »

I use a circle cutter for large circles (dishes etc.) and a lens cutter for small circles ( pendants etc.). They fire fine without anything else done to them.

Nick
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Flowers
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« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2015, 06:16:15 AM »

Thank you
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flame n fuse
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« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2015, 07:00:20 AM »

I cut circles myself and then use the offcuts for other items (though I do have a big pile of offcuts!!), Cutting with a glasscutter gives a cleaner break than with a ringsaw and they don't need extra finishing. I don't use a grinder, so can't comment on that.
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Zeldazog
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« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2015, 07:24:23 AM »

Hi I would like to cut circles and squiggles and more angular shapes. I will clean the pieces well after  Smiley should you use a circle cutter for cutting circles then or just buy them pre cut?

If you can get to grips with a cutter, it's considerably cheaper to do them yourself, even accounting for wastage (offcuts, which as Denise says, can be used for other items)
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Zeldazog
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« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2015, 07:28:17 AM »

I've got a second hand linisher, which whilst not essential I guess, makes my life a whole lot easier for some things.  Then again I have the luxury of space in the corner for it, and its brilliant for when I am doing external workshops for quickly smoothing off the edges of cut squares for coaster decorations, etc

I also have the  Inland swap top, but I don't get that out very often as it's such a faff if I want the flat disk instead of the grinder bit.  Swap-tops are as rare as hens teeth these days though, but depending on what sort of "squiggles" you want, you might find the normal 'drum' grinders are fine as they can do the inner radius of curves - popular in stained glass for precision shapes.
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Pat from Canvey
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« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2015, 09:03:08 AM »

I cut circles myself and then use the offcuts for other items (though I do have a big pile of offcuts!!),
You could have some fun with pot melts for the offcuts or hire a vitrigraph kiln from a local studio and use the offcuts and odd bits of stringer or rods to make new glass rods.
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chas
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« Reply #10 on: October 29, 2015, 11:04:49 AM »

We don't have a ringsaw (which may mean we don't need one) but do have a grinder, and got it early on. Sometimes, you seem to get misscuts which are just too small for grozing, sometimes you get little 'flares' at the corners of fused work which need regularising to bring the thing back to shape. All this can be tackled with abrasive sheets, stones etc (we've got plenty of those too) but a grinder makes short work of it.

Chas
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Moira HFG
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« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2015, 12:26:28 PM »

Hi Flowers!

Much as I love excuses to buy tools, I think if you are just starting out it might be best to get some practice with hand tools first. As time goes by, and you move from simple projects to more complex ones, you will find yourself thinking - this would be so much easier if I had "X". Then you'll know what you want, and why you want it!

Have fun!
Moira  Smiley
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Pat from Canvey
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« Reply #12 on: November 06, 2015, 04:38:53 AM »

I second what Moira has said. It's not the amount of tools you own if you're a fuser or a beader starting out, but the practice you do and dedication to producing good, albeit simple things.
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chas
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« Reply #13 on: November 06, 2015, 10:01:45 AM »

Hi I would like to cut circles and squiggles and more angular shapes. I will clean the pieces well after  Smiley should you use a circle cutter for cutting circles then or just buy them pre cut?

Pat, Moira, I hesitate to disagree but if 'Flowers' is cutting anything other than straight lines, and regardless of whether they do that freehand or with a circle/lens cutter (but particularly down in small diameters with a lens cutter, and worst of all in anything thicker than 2mm and small) there's a good chance of nibs that need grinding off even after much experience. Having a bit of kit that does that job easily is a blessing. There's no greater enjoyment to be had from making life difficult and Flowers doesn't ask the cheapest route to success. Go, buy the kit Flowers! Enjoy!!

Chas
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