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St Ives Glass Studio
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Author Topic: Thin fire paper problems  (Read 1414 times)
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JudiJ
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« on: June 28, 2015, 03:53:56 PM »

Hi, I'm very new to slumping and have only done it a few times now. I'm using an SC2? I seem to have a problem whereby the little slumped pieces have marks on them when the programme has finished. It looks like powder from the paper but I'm not sure. It's happening every time and very disappointing. Is there any way to remove it or stop it from happening? Any help/advice would be most appreciated.
Thank you
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Blue Box Studio
Blue sky thinking & a load of hot air
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Just give me the coffee and no one gets hurt!


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« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2015, 06:26:42 PM »

What kind of marks?  Life an imprint from the paper?  I must admit I now use Papyrus paper from Spectrum, I found it smoother (and you can often fire twice on it - and it goes in the bin as a sheet, now a pile of dust).  I wonder if the firing is too hot, if the paper is imprinting?
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JudiJ
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« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2015, 04:19:08 AM »

Thank you for replying. I tried to put up a picture but I don't know how!! I only use my iPad so maybe it's something to do with that. The marks are mainly on the sides but some do stretch over the top of the dome. It's like some of the paper when it's turned to powder has stuck. Sorry I know this is very hard to explain without a pic  Sad
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flame n fuse
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« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2015, 04:45:54 AM »

Dear JudiJ
You might be getting a mixture of things - if it's somewhere that hasn't been in contact with the thinfire, it could be devitrification - which can be caused by over firing (some opaque colours are especially prone to do this), and it often occurs with edges which have been ground and not cleaned enough. Sometimes the thinfire also causes white bits - these will probably come off if you clean with a diamond pad. Have you looked at the technical pages on the Bullseye and Warmglass websites?   Also if the thinfire was poking above the glass it might have flopped over and caught the upper side of the glass. Do you get the same problems if you use kilnwash?
We have 2 kilns and in both of them find that we get better results if we fire at lower temperatures than Bullseye recommend - but it could be that their calibrations are wrong.
Julia
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JudiJ
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« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2015, 06:53:49 PM »

Thank you both for replying. I think I'll try either a wash or papyrus paper to see if it might be the paper I'm using. Hopefully that will do the trick.  Smiley
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