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Author Topic: Easy cut lense cutter  (Read 2886 times)
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anditsinthefish
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« on: February 28, 2015, 10:53:29 AM »

I decided to treat myself and choose the easy cut lense cutter after reading reviews on Amazon and on here. Out of about 10 circles I have managed one. I can score them but I can't get them out without the sheet breaking.. I've tried YouTube and watched a wonderful video where he pushed it to get the lines to break first and I got that to work on clear (3mm) but I've not lost two sheets of colour trying to do the same and I really don't want to wastes anymore.

What am i missing as everyone else seems to get on so well with it? Sarah x
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Sarah xx
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jeannette
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« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2015, 12:10:55 PM »

I actually don't get on that well with it.
Make sure that your glass isn't cold, you need to have spare glass around the edge and then you score your circle in the middle. From the score, but not quite touching, you need to run scores out the the edge in 4 or so places. Then you need to start running the circle round and be quite gentle doing it bit by bit.
When you get all the way around, you scores to the edge can be gently run and keep slow until you get to the circle.
My favourite for this is the running tool that has a point, rather than running pliers.Then I can see the run happening through the hole and stop it if it gets away.

Not sure if that makes sense or helps. I still have grrr moments with it,
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Pat from Canvey
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« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2015, 02:32:22 PM »

You might find that these help to run the score on opaque glass,  http://www.creativeglassshop.co.uk/product/30962/ringstar-glass-running-pliers.html   You look through the hole on top to position the pliers with the score line central to the hole circle and then apply pressure. Move the pliers a little and do the same all the way round. Then do as jeanette suggests with breaking out the circle with lines going from the edge of the glass to join the run score. I posted a diagram a few weeks ago on another post.
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Zeldazog
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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2015, 04:28:54 PM »

One thing I have found really helpful which I only ever use when cutting circles, as well as my normal Toyo and Silberschhitt pencil cutters, I have an pistol grip cutter



The curved top of the cutter is excellent for running the score on a circle, by rocking it over the line.  I find it more effective than the normal thumb method, but in all honesty, I don't use it for any straight or even wavy scores - just the circle.

You don't need to buy one of these, anything with a similar radius curve would do the trick I think.

Practice, practice, and opaque are harder to do (I personally have more errors with colours, find it harder to break out the score line)

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Nicknack
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« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2015, 04:45:02 PM »

I seem to have a problem with white Angry, but not too bad with others.  I press the edge of the circle (from the uncut side) with the end of one handle of my mosaic cutters - rounded end, covered in rubber (?).  I do the scoring in from the sides before that, and then break off the bits that are still attached to the circle with my grozing pliers.  Sometimes there are a few spiky bits left , but I can usually get them off with the grozing pliers, and get a reasonable circle that looks OK when fused.

Nick
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jeannette
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« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2015, 01:34:20 AM »

Yes white and black can misbehave a lot I find. Most important thing is going really slowly on the run and if you have any flaws in the glass avoid those where you score, harder to see on opaques...
(Thanks Pat, that was exactly the runners I was alluding to, I bought them just for circles).
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Pat from Canvey
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« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2015, 03:14:33 AM »

  I do the scoring in from the sides before that, and then break off the bits that are still attached to the circle with my grozing pliers. 
Nick, I was always taught to run the circle score first then do the scoring in from the sides. That way, I was told that the run line stops the side scores from going over the round score line. I don't then get bits still attached to the circle.
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Nicknack
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« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2015, 03:23:38 AM »

Thanks, Pat, I'll try that.

Nick
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Zeldazog
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« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2015, 07:09:50 AM »

I've seen those types of running pliers but never really thought about how useful they could be - of course, with my method of circle cutting, I have to turn the glass over to run the score.  Which is fine for clear and transparent colours, but does make life difficult on opaques!

I use cut runners often, but only the straight ones, especially for multiples like when I am cutting lots small window hangers or xmas decorations.

Ah, more things to invest in, but thanks for pointing them out Pat, I hadn't really noticed the difference.  I see Silberschnitt also do some where the breaking bar can be rotated, but they're about double the price...
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Blue Box Studio
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« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2015, 07:31:36 AM »

I've got one and initially had success then a lot of failures.  Once I went back to the Warm Glass video I found it was because I didn't run the circle first before putting in the score marks so every time I went to break out half the circle went too.  More success since (although still not 100%).  I guess it is like all things, once you have the knack.

Now if I could just master larger sheets of glass as well, still struggling, mainly with white, but my pile of small trinket dishes is now impressively suitable for a few fairs Wink
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anditsinthefish
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« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2015, 07:37:10 AM »

Thank you all for your tips! I didn't think about the cold, and its pretty chilly in my shed.

Pat- I didn't think about making sure the run line around the circle was done before I made the outside cuts. I will invest in some of those pliers.

Zeldzog - I did wonder if my cutter was a little on the cheap side (ebay purchase...:S) and was looking to upgrade.

What cutters does everyone prefer?

I am just going to persevere and keep going... PPP after all! xx

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Sarah xx
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jeannette
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« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2015, 12:03:06 PM »

I like this one, but also have the pencil shaped one.
http://www.warm-glass.co.uk/toyo-glass-cutter-custom-grip-p-4011.html?cPath=177_70
I really don't mind which I use to be honest. The grip on this one is quite natural, which is why I bought it.
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Blue Box Studio
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« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2015, 12:20:43 PM »

Does this Warm Glass You Tube video help anyone - about 1:30 (or there about) in they start breaking out the circle. http://youtu.be/r8PyNiBRuW4
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Pat from Canvey
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« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2015, 12:54:21 PM »

I used a cheap silicon carbide cutter and no oil for years when making stained glass windows. I still use one when cutting bottles in half. It doesn't necessarily follow that the more expensive a tool. the beter the cut.
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Moira HFG
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« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2015, 03:31:08 PM »

Another tip to throw in - I now score circles on a plastic turntable. I turn the glass around with my left hand whilst holding the cutter still in my right. I find this helps get even angle and pressure.

With that and the Ringstar breakers I don't get so many failures now.
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