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Author Topic: Fusing in a SC2 - newbie questions  (Read 2069 times)
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Blue Box Studio
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« on: October 24, 2014, 04:48:25 AM »

I want to try a bit of fusing in my SC2, I know I can't make anything large.  Laney's lent me a book and given me a few pointers but just a quick question (or two) whilst they are in my head and before I spend money at Warm Glass (which is dangerously close to home). 

Can I do this using the programmer or do I have to be with the kiln to open doors, remove vents etc (as the book I have implies), was rather hoping I could take cold beads out, pop in a shelf of ready to fuse work and come back in the morning but suspect it might need more input from me.

Honest, I have had a look on here, but is there a basic fusing schedule for the SC2 on here that would be ok for coasters, light catchers that sort of thing?  I gather different types of kilns need different programmes and front loaders probably shouldn't have the door opening, will cool at a different rate to a top loader etc.

Any clues and pointers gratefully received.  Until I've had a go I won't know if I take to it so won't be buying a bigger kiln for this for a while.  I'm starting from the bottom, not done this at at all.  Have booked onto a 3 hour taster session next month but don't think we'll be using SC2s and not sure how much I'll learn in 3 hours, might just be more doing than learning.
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flame n fuse
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« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2014, 05:19:03 AM »

Dear Sue
Yes you can use a SC2 for fusing and use the programmer. Our programme for Bullseye is
ramp1. 400 to 650 hold 5
ramp 2 full to 810 hold 10
ramp 3 482 hold 30
ramp 4 80 to 370 hold 0
we then let it cool naturally to about 100 and then open the door a crack if we want to hurry it up. if we're being clever we leave the vent at the top open on part of the way up to burn off the thinfire and then close the vent, and then open it on the way down
Hope this makes sense!
Julia
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Blue Box Studio
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« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2014, 05:25:26 AM »

Thanks Julia, that makes sense and is really helpful.  With my kiln being at the far end of the garden and it invariably raining if I need to go out there at night, I'm keen not to have to sit with it so that looks good.  If I happen to be out there (World Cup hogging the TV) then I can play with the vent but would rather not have too if I don't need to.  I'm sort of hoping it can take on a double life for a while, beads - glass - beads - glass....

Was hoping to get to Warm Glass on Monday to find someone who can spare me a few minutes to get me kitted out with a few bits and then I can have a go next week Smiley

Thanks again
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Nicknack
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« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2014, 06:36:23 AM »

I use my SC2 for fusing small things, and it's brilliant.  My schedule for Bullseye (and related dichroic!) is
ramp 1 222 to 677 hold 30
ramp 2 333 to 800 hold 4
ramp 3 Full to 482 hold 30
cool naturally.

I don't leave the vent open, and I've never had any problems with this programme.  I did have to experiment a bit, as every kiln is different.  When I tried it at first I took it up to 810 for 10 mins, and it wen too gloopy, and made puddles, so I played with it, and found 800 for 4 mins is ideal in my kiln.  I use the preset programme in my Fusion 10, and that is perfect for that kiln.  I would advise you being there at the highest temperature for the first few firings to make sure it's doing what you want.  You can open the kiln a crack to flash cool for a few moments as soon as you've got the result you want, and it won't hurt.  If you still get bubbles with larger things you can increase the holding time on ramp 1 to 40 mins. I also use bits of clear stringer in the corners between layers to help remove large bubbles.

Best of luck, Sue, have fun!

Nick xx
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Blue Box Studio
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« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2014, 07:38:06 AM »

I use my SC2 for fusing small things, and it's brilliant.  My schedule for Bullseye (and related dichroic!) is
ramp 1 222 to 677 hold 30
ramp 2 333 to 800 hold 4
ramp 3 Full to 482 hold 30
cool naturally.

I don't leave the vent open, and I've never had any problems with this programme.  I did have to experiment a bit, as every kiln is different.  When I tried it at first I took it up to 810 for 10 mins, and it wen too gloopy, and made puddles, so I played with it, and found 800 for 4 mins is ideal in my kiln.  I use the preset programme in my Fusion 10, and that is perfect for that kiln.  I would advise you being there at the highest temperature for the first few firings to make sure it's doing what you want.  You can open the kiln a crack to flash cool for a few moments as soon as you've got the result you want, and it won't hurt.  If you still get bubbles with larger things you can increase the holding time on ramp 1 to 40 mins. I also use bits of clear stringer in the corners between layers to help remove large bubbles.

Best of luck, Sue, have fun!

Nick xx


Thanks Nick.  When I get some free time I'll take up your offer and visit.
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Nicknack
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« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2014, 07:43:04 AM »

That would be great, Sue.  If you have anything that's too big for the SC2 bring it with you, and I'll put it in the Fusion 10 next time I fire it up.

Nick xx
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Blue Box Studio
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« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2014, 11:45:52 AM »

That would be great, Sue.  If you have anything that's too big for the SC2 bring it with you, and I'll put it in the Fusion 10 next time I fire it up.

Nick xx

Thank you Smiley  Hoping things will be quieter after next week, when we've handed MiL's house back and the house clearance folks have removed the last of it all.
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snowdrops
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« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2014, 01:03:39 PM »

I use the Warm Glass recommended schedule for my full fuse cabochons in my SC2.  I don't remove the cone and vent on the way up and I don't flash cool it on the way down. I programme and leave.  Altho I do    just open the door slightly after it beeps when finished if I'm around.   The Thinfire usually stays in one piece to hoover up. 
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Zeldazog
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« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2014, 03:53:54 PM »

The venting only applies to a brand new kiln (to burn off the binders etc used in the manufacturing process) and it is also recommended to vent when using something like glassline paper, I believe.   I very rarely vent my own kiln, I set the kiln off running and go home until the next day.

Personally I'd go with Nicknacks' program, but add in ramp 4 from Julia's program (I believe in a good anneal, and I don't know what the natural cool down rate of an SC2 is) - especially if you're going for a coaster

And I might be wrong, but also kilns tend to run hotter the longer you have them (thermocouple loses a little bit of accuracy) , so the 810 might be a bit too high for an oft used kiln.  Of course, it its not hot enough, you can always try a little hotter, but you can't do anything if you over-fired.
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Blue Box Studio
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« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2014, 05:48:47 PM »

Thanks for that, Dawn. Might answer another niggle I have with my kiln as the last few weeks I am getting some tiny dents in a few beads which I've decided is due to the post garage ramp over shooting. Never used to but if thermocouple get less accurate, perhaps that's the reason.  Am hoping to get to Warm Glass Monday to get a few bits to have a go.
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Zeldazog
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« Reply #10 on: October 24, 2014, 06:31:02 PM »

It was something I read a long while back when I was first looking at kilns, I have no idea where I read it, whether it was on here or somewhere like Warm Glass (the forum).  I bought my first kiln in 2007 though, so it could have been anywhere!  It could even have been a kiln technician or one of the ceramicists at Uni.

But I remember it as being something along the lines of it being slowly, but increasingly out, but would be in the same direction (so not running hot one day, and cooler the next) - it seems quite a specific thing to remember, so I don't think I imagined it.  I am sure it was along the lines as it the thermocouple will be reading the temperature as lower than it actually is, so the kiln runs a little hotter.

It is one of the main reasons why I always bang on about people getting to know their own kilns - someone else's program is a great starting point to work from, as you are planning to do x

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GorgeousGlassGifts
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« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2017, 06:53:34 PM »

Thanks Zeldazog- that explains a lot. When I bought my kiln 2nd hand, it was over 10 years old & I found, through trial & error and with some help from Lee at Kilncare, that I need to tack fuse Bullseye at what my kiln thinks is 715C and full fuse at what it thinks is 780C. Interestingly enough at slumping temperatures the standard programmes that come with Creative Glass's moulds work fine, so it's only at over 640C that the thermocouple is adrift.

Once I'd worked out what worked with my kiln, I didn't have any more problems. Unlike the microwave kiln, my Kilncare kiln is consistent and reliable. 
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