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Author Topic: Propane inside shed or not?  (Read 3582 times)
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anditsinthefish
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« on: April 29, 2014, 04:08:15 AM »

Hey everyone Smiley I know there are a few posts about keeping propane inside the home. But I am having a shed build that isn't connected to the house. I was going to have my propane tanks (I need two) outside and fed in but my dad who is building it has said he wants to keep the tanks inside.

I then got a phone call from my future father in law is donating me a new 19kg tank (which I am hoping Calor might swap for a 6kg when I buy a refill) and that I can't keep propane inside under and circumstances...

So I am in a little quandary about what to do, my dad and my future father in law don't see eye to eye as it is Tongue

Any advice is would be great, Sarah x
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Sarah xx
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mizgeorge
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« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2014, 04:27:49 AM »

I find it easier to keep tanks outside - just from a space point of view.

However, you could use just one tank either with quick release valves or a splitter, which makes things easier.
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theflyingbedstead
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« Reply #2 on: April 29, 2014, 05:10:14 AM »

I keep my tank in my brick built studio which is an out-building. But for space I move it outside when I'm working.

I wonder about the effects of UV damage on the hosing if its kept outside all of the time?

And it is a good idea to test regularly for gas leaks.
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Charlotte x
Lynnybobs
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« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2014, 06:42:16 AM »

I use a quick release coupling and keep the tank outside when I'm working (just in case of any problems as my shedio is small) but store it under my bench when I'm not using it because the weather and UV will degrade the hosing in time.
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Lynnybobs
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Pat from Canvey
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« Reply #4 on: April 29, 2014, 09:01:25 AM »

My propane has been in the dining area of my lounge for the last 7 plus years with no problems.
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Redhotsal
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« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2014, 11:13:20 AM »

If it's at all possible try and keep them outside. That way, if you get a leak they will be leaking to the outside as opposed to filling the shed from the bottom up. Propane is heavier than air so it sinks - you could have quite a lot in the shed if it's leaking before you are aware of it.
However, as Charlotte has said - you will get UV damage to the hoses, which will cause them to get brittle and maybe crack over a period of time. So, the best option is to cover them over (I used to use a large upturned plastic flower pot with a slot cut into it) or better still build them a little shed-let so that they are protected from the elements but safely out of the shed, if possible.
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Glyn Burton
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« Reply #6 on: April 29, 2014, 11:46:55 AM »

I keep my bottles inside when I am using them, empties and reserve full ones are in a gas cage outside but I am very careful to check for leaks.
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ajda
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« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2014, 05:08:05 AM »

Like Pat and Glyn, mine is inside. I always keep the main valve on the cylinder closed except when actually in use. It's important to check your system for leaks - if one of your connections is dodgy and you are leaking gas inside your workspace it probably makes little difference whether the tank itself is inside or out. Ventilation is important too, for the gas itself and the fumes from burning it. In a really enclosed space, like a boat, propane is very dangerous - as Redhotsal says, it is heavier than air, so will pool in the bilges and may cause serious explosions. How airtight is your shed?!
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anditsinthefish
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« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2014, 05:24:31 AM »

Like Pat and Glyn, mine is inside. I always keep the main valve on the cylinder closed except when actually in use. It's important to check your system for leaks - if one of your connections is dodgy and you are leaking gas inside your workspace it probably makes little difference whether the tank itself is inside or out. Ventilation is important too, for the gas itself and the fumes from burning it. In a really enclosed space, like a boat, propane is very dangerous - as Redhotsal says, it is heavier than air, so will pool in the bilges and may cause serious explosions. How airtight is your shed?!

Thanks for all your advice! I think my best option is a little covered part behind the shed where they can be stored. The shed as far as I'm aware will be pretty airtight as its double glazed. It is yet to be built (it arrives a week on friday Cheesy) but best to get them plumbed in right when its being built!!
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Sarah xx
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ajda
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« Reply #9 on: April 30, 2014, 06:12:06 AM »

The shed as far as I'm aware will be pretty airtight as its double glazed.

In that case you need to sort out good ventilation/fume extraction - is that in the plans?
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anditsinthefish
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« Reply #10 on: April 30, 2014, 06:22:39 AM »

The shed as far as I'm aware will be pretty airtight as its double glazed.

In that case you need to sort out good ventilation/fume extraction - is that in the plans?

oh yes that's going in Smiley
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Sarah xx
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fionaess
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« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2014, 01:33:33 PM »

I have kept my propane in the house for years. Also many years ago we had a full size propane cooked and obviously that was kept inside  Grin
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oliver90owner
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« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2014, 01:58:50 PM »

Probably wise to enquire at your local calor supplier/installer for up-to-date rules and laws.

Propane bottles are not permitted to be stored in a house and any insurance policy can/may be voided.

Butane bottles are OK by virtue of the lower volatility (and thus pressure).  Propane pipework is permissible (think here cooking on calor) because the internal pipes will be low pressure, the regulator being outside on the bottle(s).

Any propane store requires good bottom ventilation - yet another good reason for them to be outside.

Be safe.

RAB





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Pegasus
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« Reply #13 on: May 01, 2014, 06:25:22 AM »

Defo inside......that way no one can access it but me. I wouldn't like to think that an intruder into the garden could get hold of my propane. There are some numptys out there!
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Wysterya
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« Reply #14 on: May 01, 2014, 08:18:07 AM »

We had a propane cooker for years and our neighbours still have one and the bottles are always outside.  Calor Gas say this:

Storing gas bottles

Gas bottles, depending on their size and weight, can be heavy because they’re filled with pressurised gas. At Calor we take safety very seriously, so to prevent injury and property damage, compressed gas bottles need to be stored, handled, used and maintained properly. Here are some basic storage rules you should follow at all times:

DO

Store and use gas bottles in an upright position
Store gas bottles in well-ventilated places
Ensure gas bottles are stored away from heat and ignition sources
Make sure gas bottles are stored outdoors, away from building entry/exit points and drains

DON'T

Store or use gas bottles below ground level
Use gas bottles in places where gas is prohibited, such as high rise flats
Keep gas bottles near any corrosive, toxic or oxidant material
For residential properties, you can use up to 15kg of Butane (2 blue 7.5kg gas bottles) indoors, for example in portable gas heaters. You can also store a further maximum of 15kg indoors.

Our red Propane gas bottles can be used indoors in commercial and industrial premises on a temporary basis, for example when you’re using a blowtorch or air heater but the gas bottles must be stored outdoors.

In the case of fixed installations, Propane gas bottles must be sited outside, whilst Calor stockists and commercial and industrial premises should store LPG in accordance with the UKLPG Code of Practice No. 7 "Storage of Full and Empty LPG Cylinders and Cartridges".

For more information please see our ‘Code of guidance for the storage of cylinders’ and ‘Cylinder storage information’ PDFs for more detailed information. If you’d like any more guidance, please call our technical helpline on 01926 318 497 and we’ll be happy to advise you.
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