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Author Topic: new kiln owner...next week.  (Read 1268 times)
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sandmor1
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« on: March 06, 2014, 08:07:09 PM »

I am about to become a new Mum...my new "baby" arrives next week and I want to be prepared for her.

She comes with shelf/props/kiln wash and firing paper, although I have plenty of thinfire which I bought for my little microwave kiln.

I already have a cutter but only a cheap one which I bought at the local DIY store. I also have a running pliers and mosiac cutters.

I have ordered a haik brush but what else do you think I need to order to be able to make full use of her straight away.

I will need some moulds, I know but I can wait a week or two for those. Should I order some kind of kiln furniture ? And talking of kiln furniture...is there a difference between glass kiln and ceramic kiln furniture ?

Thanks for all help

Sandra
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Zeldazog
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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2014, 08:27:28 PM »

Quote
Should I order some kind of kiln furniture ? And talking of kiln furniture...is there a difference between glass kiln and ceramic kiln furniture

What kiln furniture are you thinking of, your kiln comes with a shelf and props already - you might need dams at some point if you're box casting or stacking high, but perhaps get to know your kiln first.

I managed fine with the original three props from my Hotstart and no extras for quite some time - for the shelf when fusing, and the same props for slumping moulds - after all, you'd be doing two separate firings anyway.

Ceramic and glass kiln shelves are usually made of the same material.  Some of the ceramic kiln shelves at college uni were usually thicker than my glass ones, but that could be due to all sorts of factors, such as their size, and how long they'd been kicking around.  Also, in ceramics, you tend to stack shelves, so could end up with considerable weight (although props should be in throughout the stack) - but you don't usually stack glass shelves and not in a top firing kiln.

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sandmor1
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« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2014, 09:02:15 PM »

Thanks for the info...I was hoping I would be able to get going straight away.

Sandra
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Nicknack
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To bead, or not to bead? ..... stupid question!


« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2014, 10:42:04 PM »

Congratulations!  A pair of grozing pliers might be useful, but not immediately necessary.  Have fun.  I have kiln envy - I only have my SC2 for both fusing and beadmaking, so I can't do both on the same day, and I only have room for one coaster at a time (with about 5 or 6 pendants or pairs of earrings around it, though).

Nick
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Barnacle Bay
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« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2014, 12:24:06 PM »

Congratulations  Smiley

I initially bought a cheap cutter, my advice is to ditch it and  buy a good cutter like a Toyo or something similar with possibly a lubricating resevoir. 

I also have a tile cutter which is great for cutting large glass sheets - easy peasy. 

Glass sanding blocks and a Dremel.



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sandmor1
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« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2014, 03:23:54 PM »

Congratulations  Smiley

I initially bought a cheap cutter, my advice is to ditch it and  buy a good cutter like a Toyo or something similar with possibly a lubricating resevoir. 

I also have a tile cutter which is great for cutting large glass sheets - easy peasy. 

Glass sanding blocks and a Dremel.

I will buy a good cutter, I had been thinking of that.

I already have a Glastar grinder  so maybe I don't need the sanders Huh and a Dremel (including the bench stand)

Please keep on coming with the recommendations..I do appreciate the help.

Sandra




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Barnacle Bay
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« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2014, 05:17:57 PM »

The tile cutter I bought came from B & W,  it will cut sheets 400 x 300.  Buying bigger sheets works out cheaper than buying smaller ones.  For under 20 squid it is a good investment, but keep the wheel lubricated with white spirit - the same for using hand held cutters  Wink


Dont forget to approach you local glass supplier for Float glass - he/she will generally cut a 1200 x 650 down to manageable sizes  Wink  Loads of things available for float glass fusing, inc colours etc.  I am only telling you this because I am not well.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2014, 05:21:13 PM by Barnacle Bay » Logged
Pat from Canvey
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« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2014, 06:17:25 PM »

If you're buying larger sheets of glass, you can cut them with your glass cutter provided you get a  set square, see http://www.warm-glass.co.uk/small-cutting-lsquare-p-287.html
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