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Beads and glass supplies from Tuffnells
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Author Topic: Flat round discs  (Read 8516 times)
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julieHB
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« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2012, 01:36:54 PM »

Another suggestion for you  Cheesy:

Use a diamond core bit of the right size. Normally one uses the glass with the hole in, but I cannot see why it cannot be used to make circles, as long as you get a drill bit where the core can easily be "poked out".  The circles/cores would be equal in size. They will need fire polishing to achieve a perfect smooth edge, but that can easily be achieved in a kiln.

Here is one place to get some info on how to drill in glass: http://www.eternaltools.com/how-to-drill-glass/
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Julie xx

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Zeldazog
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« Reply #16 on: June 05, 2012, 01:45:10 PM »

Brill idea Julie!
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julieHB
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« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2012, 01:49:43 PM »

Brill idea Julie!

Thanks, Dawn - I might even use that idea myself  Grin Grin
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Martman
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« Reply #18 on: June 09, 2012, 01:55:51 PM »

Thanks Julie I will give it a go.

Mart
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julieHB
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« Reply #19 on: June 09, 2012, 04:52:46 PM »

I ordered myself a couple of the eternal tools core drills, and had a little go:


small circles by JulieHB, on Flickr

The glass I cut was the thin BE glass (1.5mm thick?). The biggest circles in the picture is about 18mm, and the smaller size about 13mm.

A couple of observations - the diameter of the final circle is 1.5-2mm smaller than the specified drill diameter. I you need a perfect edge without melting the glass you still need to cold work the edges with a grinder or diamond pad/sickle stone before you fire polish them.

for me, who just want to fuse a few layers together to equally sized cabs it works very well.  Smiley

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Pat from Canvey
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« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2012, 05:25:15 PM »

Thanks for that info Julie. Unfortunately when I had to do about 100 circles some years ago for the frame of a large panel, each was about 2 inches in diameter. I chickened out and got the kids to foil them, also the small rectangles for the frame.
Can't find the original photo but heres a corner of the panel showing part of the frame plus a bit of sky. I foiled the white triangles          Shocked  Shocked  Shocked
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julieHB
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« Reply #21 on: June 09, 2012, 05:27:25 PM »

Oh, well done, Pat - that must have been a LOT of work!!!
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Julie xx

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Pat from Canvey
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« Reply #22 on: June 09, 2012, 08:49:15 PM »

Thanks Julie. It took 3 months to make.
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Sarah999
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« Reply #23 on: February 04, 2013, 04:15:19 PM »

Hi. Just found this post from yonks ago.

If I pile 3mm thick glass (cut to 1cm by 1cm) on top of each other (3 of them as suggested) do you know how big these circles will be?

Thanks.

Sarah.
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Trudi
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« Reply #24 on: February 04, 2013, 08:25:31 PM »

One way to find out x
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Jane C ♫
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« Reply #25 on: November 16, 2013, 10:03:03 AM »

Freeze and fuse is a great idea for this - if you get the firing just right then you'll get lovely clean corners. Use an electric toothbrush or something to vibrate your mix to get the worst of the air bubbles out before freezing.
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Nicknack
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To bead, or not to bead? ..... stupid question!


« Reply #26 on: November 16, 2013, 11:21:44 AM »

Freeze and fuse is a great idea for this - if you get the firing just right then you'll get lovely clean corners. Use an electric toothbrush or something to vibrate your mix to get the worst of the air bubbles out before freezing.

Years ago, in the 70s, I did a course on Lost Wax Casting, and our teacher (an extrovert eccentric! Cheesy) used a vibrator bought from a sex shop to get the bubbles out of the casting medium.  It was the first time (and, I think, the last) that I had seen one. Shocked

Nick
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fionaess
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« Reply #27 on: November 16, 2013, 12:17:11 PM »

What a very interesting thread  Roll Eyes
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If it's got a hole, it's a bead !
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