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Author Topic: Ventilation - what do you look for?  (Read 2469 times)
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DragonBright
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« on: April 24, 2013, 11:10:14 AM »

As noted elsewhere, we're gearing up to start selling an extraction system, initially aimed at lampworkers, but probably suitable for other things needing ventilation.  Our basic setup will consist of a fan, a hood, ducting and an external grill (to keep nature out of your ducting), plus clips etc. for holding it all together.  I'm also working on a flexible mounting to allow the hood to be positioned as you need (I'll post more details of this once I have a prototype together).  Finally, I'm in the process of writing the detailed instruction sheet - this will be roughly 1 sheet of A4, explaining how to put it all together.  We're aiming to get the whole lot in for 60 plus postage.  More detail is available on our website (see my sig for a link).

We are using a prototype version of this on our own glass bench, and it seems to work well - enough extraction power to take the nastiness away, without producing a howling gale over the torch, and more-or-less silent (you can't hear it over the minor torch).  I can post piccies if that helps.

So, what I'd like to know, is what you look for in an extraction system?  Does the above sound like something you might be interested in?  Is it missing anything, or is there anything we can do to make it more useful to you?  Is 2m of ducting likely to be enough (this represents the total distance from the back of the hood to the hole in your wall, and will happily bend around corners)?  Would you expect such a system to come with a lead and plug, or would you prefer to do that yourself?  

Really, what I'd like is to get some idea of what folks' ideal extraction system would be.

Alison
« Last Edit: April 24, 2013, 11:29:52 AM by DragonBright » Logged

DragonBright: quality tools and accessories for craftspeople - visit us at www.dragonbright.co.uk.
cbeadies
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« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2013, 11:14:51 AM »

Sounds good, if it is being sold as a complete extraction kit, I think it should have the lead and plug so that it's 'ready to go'. I think noise is often an issue, so the quieter it is when operating, the better.
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aercraft
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« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2013, 11:36:44 AM »

I'll be looking for an extraction setup soon, and would only buy if it's ready to go - so all wired up please.
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Anne
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« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2013, 12:14:23 PM »

Sounds interesting! I cant make a hole in the wall as my house is rented, so something that could be used without would be good!
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DragonBright
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« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2013, 05:29:11 PM »

Ok, so wired up is good.  Can do!

The hole in the wall is optional - you just need to make sure the outlet end of the ducting goes to wherever you want the fumes to end up.  You could easily hang it out of a window, for example.  In this case, you need to know that where you're planning to put the hood (i.e. your work area) is within a bit less than 2m of where you want the outlet to go - a bit less than 2m to allow for bends in the duct.  We had planned to supply 2m of ducting as standard (more available for a little extra cash), to keep the main cost down.  As a starting point, our own setup only uses 1m total, but the outlet is pretty much directly over the bench.

The fan we use is pretty much silent - I can't hear it over the noise of the minor and oxycon.

Thanks for the feedback, folks - it's jolly helpful!

Alison
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DragonBright: quality tools and accessories for craftspeople - visit us at www.dragonbright.co.uk.
CarolB
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« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2013, 04:22:39 AM »

I need ventilation but didn't want a hole in the wall. Carol
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DragonBright
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« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2013, 09:53:34 AM »

Sorry to those waiting for more news - we're working on it, but the bank is being sloooooow sorting out our account, so the webshop is just sitting waiting...

Continuing the earlier discussion, I'd love to know what folks think of our installation instructions - you can read them here: http://dragonbright.co.uk/extraction_instructions.pdf .  They're a bit wordy, but hopefully cover everything one needs to know.  Obviously, some bits would be a bit clearer with all the parts in front of you, but here's a pic of the key bits to help:


If anyone's desparate for a system, let me know - we're hoping to be properly set up with a webshop etc. any day now (watch for the announcement in the sellers sub-forum), but we can do manual sales for now - drop me an email at alison@dragonbright.co.uk.
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DragonBright: quality tools and accessories for craftspeople - visit us at www.dragonbright.co.uk.
jeannette
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« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2013, 01:51:11 PM »

Seem quite well worded to me! Not done one or got one yet (from any supplier)! Smiley
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Jeanniegems
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« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2013, 08:51:53 AM »

Any idea how much it will be approx?

Jeannie x
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DragonBright
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« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2013, 12:52:05 PM »

I've put the full details in a PM, but the simple version is 60+delivery.
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Hotglass28
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« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2013, 04:55:18 PM »


What is the CFM of your fans?.  One of the most important bit of info you need when buying a setup.
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DragonBright
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« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2013, 05:49:27 PM »

Our fans have a maximum flow of 230m3/hr, or 64 litres per second.  This will be reduced by very long duct runs, or very tight turns, etc. but with 6" ducting, the flow resistance is pretty low.
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DragonBright: quality tools and accessories for craftspeople - visit us at www.dragonbright.co.uk.
Hotglass28
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« Reply #12 on: May 18, 2013, 08:58:54 AM »


Not trying to be a pain but I think more people need to know that ribbed ducting may cause a problem if bent this way and that. It slows the flow rate like you say, but still people need to know this. Or did you put this info in?  I can be blind some days Grin

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DragonBright
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« Reply #13 on: May 18, 2013, 02:39:13 PM »

To be honest, you'd have to put some serious effort into getting it bent to the point where it badly restricted the airflow - the ducting is 6" diameter, and the spiral coil built into it keeps it open (unless overwhelming force is applied).  We did test a fan with a 10m length of ducting on either side (laid out straight), and it still produced enough airflow that I'd be happy using it; there is a drop in flow, but still not too bad.

I've added a note to our instructions to discourage folks from bending their ducting into pretzels - thanks for the feedback!
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DragonBright: quality tools and accessories for craftspeople - visit us at www.dragonbright.co.uk.
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