Frit-Happens !
March 19, 2019, 09:33:13 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
your ad here
News:
Where are you?? Add yourself to the NEW FHF map here  | On flickr? Join our Frit Happens group: here

VISIT THE WIKI HERE
Get FH Status updates via twitter @FritHappens

 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Beach Buggy
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Slumping in a Bead Cube - HELP!  (Read 2417 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Kathy
Forum Member
*
Posts: 30



« on: January 04, 2013, 01:32:11 PM »

Hi there

I have some miniture bottles and I'm sure I remember reading that the bead cube can be used for slumping - is this right? I have searched and searched but am not really sure what I am looking for or how to do it at all really!

Any help would be gratefully received Embarrassed

Thanks, Kathy x
Logged
justjules
Forum Member
**
Posts: 64



« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2013, 02:22:38 PM »

I'm glad you asked that question Kathy cos DH wants to have a go at slumping/fusing, so hopefully someone will have an easy answer!
 Smiley
Logged
JKC
Forum Member
****
Posts: 290


« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2013, 02:36:08 PM »

I found this info:

Effetre Moretti Glass has a C.O.E. 104.
Annealing Temperature 480-500c.
Fusing Temperature approx 720c.
Slumping Temperature approx 620c

and this in the bead cube info:

This will allow the kiln to be used for trying other mediums such as fusing or PMC right through to its maximum temperature of 920c although the kiln is primarily a bead annealer.

Hope it helps, Janet
Logged
julieHB
Global Moderator
*******
Posts: 886



WWW
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2013, 02:51:26 PM »

Kathy, have a look at this site - gives lots of info on various firing schedules:
http://www.glasscampus.com/tutorials.htm

Another datasheet I have found very useful is this one:
http://www.warm-glass.co.uk/images/pdfs/products/Basic%20Firing%20Schedules%20for%20most%20kilns.pdf

If my memory hasn't totally left the building I seem to remember that bottle glass has a COE between 80 and 85. If you start by following temperature schedules as for Bullseye glass you shouldn't be too far off.

Good luck!  Smiley
Logged

Julie xx

                            My Webbie - My Flickr
Kathy
Forum Member
*
Posts: 30



« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2013, 11:42:11 AM »

Thank you all Cheesy Will let you know how I get on Wink
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.036 seconds with 18 queries.