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Author Topic: Commercial Wine & Other Bottles -What are they made From?  (Read 8231 times)
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Barnacle Bay
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« on: June 06, 2012, 09:03:20 AM »

Only me - again

I have been wondering what Commercial Wine & Other Bottles are made from -   yep it sounds a silly question & I know they are made from glass (beat some of you to that one  Cheesy )

But I would love to know exactly what type of glass, e.g COE rating Huh

Any ideas, anyone.

Thanks once again in advance.

Louise
« Last Edit: June 06, 2012, 09:06:02 AM by MamaQuilla » Logged
Soozintheshed
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« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2012, 09:09:46 AM »

It is around the boro mark, 33 ish.... you can get them tested at Plowden & Thompson I believe.
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Barnacle Bay
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« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2012, 09:19:32 AM »

Thanks Soozintheshed - I thought it was going to be the hard stuff  Cheesy

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Kalorlo
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« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2012, 09:20:00 AM »

The things I've read have put them in the 80s - you can melt them on a hothead with patience, so I don't think they tend to be that close to boro  Huh

But... if you want to make beads from them, only use glass from the same bottle in a bead, because there's no guarantee of compatibility, even between ones that are branded the same!
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Pat from Canvey
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« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2012, 09:38:21 AM »

If you smash up the bottle you can pre- heat pieces in the kiln making it easier to melt on the torch.
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Soozintheshed
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« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2012, 10:01:31 AM »

You can melt boro on a hot head with patience too Wink
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ScarletLeonard
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« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2012, 10:07:39 AM »

Anything on a hot head requires patience

Though if you are desperate to put 2 bottles together there is a test you can do.
Melt the ends of the 2 chunks of glass, push them together then pull into a stringer. if they are incompatible they will pop apart after a short amount of time. If they remain intact for 24 hours you probably have a good chance of them working together. Maybe crush some of one bottle into frit and observe the 5% rule.
Though it is far easier to just never mix bottles.
Certainly no bottle will work with the 104, nor the 90 and 96 rods.
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Kalorlo
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« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2012, 10:47:16 AM »

You can melt boro on a hot head with patience too Wink

Yeeesss... Ok, let me rephrase: you can make bottle beads on a hothead without requiring inhuman amounts of patience  Grin Did anyone ever do the boro thing more than once?  Cheesy

Apparently Bullseye used to use recycled glass a very long time ago as a base - not anymore. Some thingies here: http://www.lampworketc.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-84743.html

It could be that we have more bottles made from boro-type ranges in the UK, not a clue!
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Barnacle Bay
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« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2012, 05:45:29 PM »

Wow very interesting - may have a play tomorrow  - now have another empty ...hic Smiley
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Zeldazog
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« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2012, 04:17:10 AM »

I always thought (wine) bottle glass was made from similar to window/float glass - which is around 83/84 usually?  I can remember seeing work by an artist who'd used bottle glass combined with float in fusing.

Of course, float will be harder to melt on a HH than 104 or even Bullseye; float needs around another 40 deg C to fully fuse than BE does.
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Ian Pearson
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« Reply #10 on: June 07, 2012, 06:16:59 AM »

Hi all, dont reply much these days but felt I needed to here. Commercial wine bottles etc are not boro. Soft glass in the main. I used to join tubes to milk bottles using a soda lime glass probably about the 90 range.

Hope all are well

Ian
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Soozintheshed
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« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2012, 08:28:55 AM »

Well thats interesting, I stand corrected, I was always told there were more like a pyrex.

I might have a play myself then  Smiley
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TracyJayne
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« Reply #12 on: June 07, 2012, 08:57:49 AM »

They seem to be different, I have used a few different ones, but the one I'm using today, a Prosecco bottle is a b****r to melt,  Sad  the champagne bottle I did a couple of months ago didn't seem to be nearly as hard to get melty.
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Hotglass28
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« Reply #13 on: June 08, 2012, 09:52:33 AM »


Oh yes, deff soda glass.  Good ole cheap glass  Grin
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Izzybeads
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« Reply #14 on: June 08, 2012, 10:11:02 AM »

Some bottles are definitely harder to full fuse or slump though, does that mean that they could be a different glass?  I am thinking Gin bottles and the like, not wine bottles, having said that, cider bottles need a higher temp to slump than wine bottles.  I have often wondered about using other glass with them, like a frit mix, but not done so far  Undecided
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