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Author Topic: Bullseye glass question  (Read 4579 times)
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cbeadies
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« on: April 02, 2012, 04:25:42 AM »

Hi,
just been looking at lovely colours of Bullseye glass on offer, just wondering does anyone on here use this type of glass?
It doesn't seem to be so widely used, does it differ in some way from popular soft glass like Effetre and CIM?

Thanks!  Smiley
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tish
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« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2012, 04:29:45 AM »

id love to know about this glass aswell also what coe is it
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Hamilton Taylor
Hamilton Taylor Studio - Flameworked and Kilnformed Glass
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« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2012, 04:31:10 AM »

Bullsete is coe 90 - not compatible with the coe 104 glasses like effetre, moretti, etc, but some pretty nice colours, still...

Sean
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GaysieMay
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« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2012, 04:39:44 AM »

I have used it to make some murrini to put in a fused piece, but I haven't used it other than that, mainly because I'm scared I'll mix it up with my 104 glass.  Izzybeads uses it and she makes the most beautiful beads, I saw some in the flesh at Harrogate bead fair and the colours were lovely especially on her flower beads.  I'll find a link:

http://www.etsy.com/shop/izzybeads

 Smiley
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Lakelady
TurnerRoweGlassArt
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« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2012, 04:45:37 AM »

Sue (awrylemming) uses it too.  I gave it a go but did manage on one occasion to mix with 104 - you don't want to be doing that!  Nice glass and colours though Smiley
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Turner Rowe Glass Art
awrylemming
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« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2012, 04:57:44 AM »

I love Bullseye glass - it doesn't pull down as well into stringer and murrini on some colours, so you do have to be picky about your choices, but the pinks are second to none, they have a lovely palette to choose from, and the glass is fab to work in sculptural and in rollers as it is stiffer than Effetre.  However, it tends to be more expensive, the vanilla rods are incredibly shocky, the white I never use as I find it marks up easily in the flame regardless of how careful you are - and I think the reason it isn't as widely used is pure and simply the lack of a silver glass manufacturer in that COE.  Shame.
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amareargentum
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« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2012, 06:12:49 AM »

I learnt using Bullseye and I really like it. It is a lot stiffer which can be good and as Sue says the pinks are yummy! I don't use it much now simply due to the wider choice available in 104. Funnily I was thinking of having a Bullseye day this week.
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GaysieMay
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« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2012, 07:49:50 AM »

I think I noticed that some colours have lead in, is that right?
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noora
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« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2012, 08:07:36 AM »

Some Bullseye sheet glass contains lead, so I guess it's the same for the rods of the same colours. I found information on the lead content on Bullseye's web site. If I remember correctly it's some of the red/pink and violet colours (those often seem to require either gold or lead or both).

I've used Bullseye a little for lampwork, I like the colours and the stiffness. I also use it a lot for fusing.
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Trudi
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« Reply #9 on: April 02, 2012, 09:57:09 AM »

The good news for lampworking is that you can use the same kiln schedule as 104!

So you can use both glasses in the same session (just not on the same beads). Just make sure you label your glass!  Wink
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Sarah
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« Reply #10 on: April 02, 2012, 12:03:28 PM »

Bullseye transparent pinks are gorgeous - the fuchsias are strong, bright pinks and the transparent lavenders are lovely too.

Its stiffer than 104 and I wouldn't recommend it on a hothead but its lovely glass.

Sarah
xxx
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Glyn Burton
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« Reply #11 on: April 02, 2012, 12:36:11 PM »

In the last twelve months I have used more than 750KG of Bullseye and it is beautiful glass but I rarely use it for lampwork as I much prefer the fluidity of Effetre. I use Bullseye for fusing and casting because I love its versatility it comes in sheets, frits, confetti, stringers, billets and rods all fully compatible and with a very big choice of compatible dichroic.
About the only time I use it for bead making is if I want to use the beautiful green and blue Aventurine's in which case I use scrap sheet glass rather than but rods so there is less chance of getting it mixed up with 104.
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flame n fuse
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« Reply #12 on: April 02, 2012, 03:29:19 PM »

I started with Bullseye and it is all very well-behaved, apart from some opal pinks and occasional whites which can be shocky (though no worse than some of the 104s). There are some lovely colours, a wide palette range and the lustres are fun. However I have recently been giving effetre and cim a go and have liked them as well (well, most of them!). Bulleye rods sound more expensive, but they are bigger, and sizes are more consistent. Also, you can buy them singly from many dealers which is nice if you want to try them out without stocking up too much. All of the dealers I use label each rod, so you have less chance of muddling up Bullseye with the 104s. Bullseye give loads of info on their website and tell you a lot about the chemistry of the glass, so that you can work out which glasses are likely to react with each other, also they give info about how to work a colour, see http://shop.bullseyeglass.com/legacy/torchtips/

What Bullseye does not seem to have is the fantastic reactions you can get with some of the 104 silver glasses like clio - which is why I am giving the 104's a go.

re the mention above about lead - do we know that the 104's don't contain it?  Bullseye address the issues of lead and cadmium food safety of their sheet glass at http://www.bullseyeglass.com/is-bullseye-glass-food-safe.html Does anyone know if it is any better or worse in this respect compared to the 104's?
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flame n fuse
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« Reply #13 on: April 09, 2012, 05:51:03 PM »

Here is a useful chart  ................   http://www.bullseyeglass.com/methods-ideas/glass-reactivity-chart.html
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Lyn G
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« Reply #14 on: April 09, 2012, 06:44:07 PM »

In the last twelve months I have used more than 750KG

Wow Glyn....that's a lot of glass!!   Shocked Shocked

Do you have any pics of what you have made with it? 

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