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Author Topic: Glass Chemistry  (Read 21619 times)
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Andy Davies
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« Reply #45 on: January 10, 2014, 07:25:10 AM »

Thanks Guyís Iíd like to support Tuffnells as theyíve been good so far with other stuff and thanks again Sally

Now I'm going to challenge the conventional wisdom. Itís said that the higher the CoE number the softer the glass and Iíve seen that on the web, now as a general rule that might be right but in reality it canít be taken as fact.

(Remember what I said on the YouTube wind generator video, Ďyou canít believe everything you see on YouTubeí  but it can be the same on the web in general, someone says something and it becomes law, well internet law.)

Iíve just cut up some  Clear CoE 90 Bullseye to compare it with the  Clear P&T CoE100 that I have and boy the difference is phenomenal. The CoE90 flows like soft butter, a real joy to play with.  With the P&T Iíd been thinking that I was going to have to go onto a two gas torch to do any good.  When I see how folk on YouTube play with the glass I thought it was all down to the extra heat but itís not. Before I get blasted I know adding oxygen makes a big difference (Iíve done a lot of oxy-acetylene welding) but unless youíve tried the P&T CoE100 glass  you may not know how stiff it is in comparison.
And remember I havenít any appropriate practical experience with other glasses.

I can't wait to get some soft glass as I think I'm really going to have some fun with it, it's a major step change, just like having the light switched on
            regards ... Andy 
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Andy Davies
Andy Davies
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Posts: 58



« Reply #46 on: January 10, 2014, 08:09:31 AM »

Just thought Iíd let you know Iíve gone for it and ordered 4 ľ Kg of mixed Effetre rods, opal and clear plus some mixed stringers on next day delivery, pity we canít magic it down the internet and get it now! (Kid-in-candy-shop mode) If it softens anything like the Bullseye CoE 90 I'll be over the moon, otherwise I'll be filling in more windows in the porch with it.

 I'll let you know how I get on.

Regards ... Andy
   
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Andy Davies
Nicknack
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To bead, or not to bead? ..... stupid question!


« Reply #47 on: January 10, 2014, 08:12:55 AM »

In my experience it should soften a bit quicker than the Bullseye.  Not used any P&T, so can't judge.

Nick
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Pat from Canvey
Only a little bit odd
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Keep on blowing


« Reply #48 on: January 10, 2014, 08:36:53 AM »

If I'm remembering correctly, Sophie is your MIL, in which case she may have some unused offcuts of Spectrum glass. A lot of the Spectrum is COE 96 and makes good glass beads provided you don't mix COE's. The transparent waterglasses made by Spectrum look particularly good when encased over a plain white opaque bead. I still have loads of Spectrum glass from when I made stained glass windows and have used some for beads. Cut into 1/4 inch strips they can be used as ersatz rods. Oddments can be held with small pliers. Another avenue for you to explore.
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Andy Davies
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« Reply #49 on: January 10, 2014, 08:48:37 AM »

As ever Iíve jumped in and done it and now I'm wondering... ĎDo they do dichroic glass thatís compatible with Effetre CoE104 ?í

If Iíd have thought about it for 10 minutes longer I might just have thought itíd be a good idea to have just one flavour of glass in the workshop as I know I'll mix them up sometime but probably only when Iíve made the best bead ever, thatíll be the one that cracks.

 Anyway I'll just have to keep the 90 and 104 separated and ditch the stodgy CoE100

I always think that itís better to do something rather than nothing but I often jump too quick, but hey I'll be having fun tomorrow and if all else fails thereís always eBay.
                     
                                      ... Andy
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Andy Davies
Andy Davies
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Posts: 58



« Reply #50 on: January 10, 2014, 09:08:12 AM »

If I'm remembering correctly, Sophie is your MIL, in which case she may have some unused offcuts of Spectrum glass. A lot of the Spectrum is COE 96 and makes good glass beads provided you don't mix COE's. The transparent waterglasses made by Spectrum look particularly good when encased over a plain white opaque bead. I still have loads of Spectrum glass from when I made stained glass windows and have used some for beads. Cut into 1/4 inch strips they can be used as ersatz rods. Oddments can be held with small pliers. Another avenue for you to explore.

Hi Pat
I'm not into text shorthand but I guess ĎMilí is teenage jargon for mother-in-law, you hip thing.

But for the Record Sophie is my beautiful partner of 22 years, as of today actually. Sheís my best friend in the whole world and is extremely tolerant of all my hobbies and I love her to distraction.

But itís Sophieís mom, Wendy who made to stained-glass/leaded vase youíll have seen and yes, Wendy did give me some glass that Iíve used as Ďstained-glassí in windows. But Iíve got more left over. I thought given that itís not specifically for remelting  that each of the different colours would/could be different CoEís but I havenít tried mixing them (pulling two together) to test compatibility.   I guess they could always be used for single colour beads but thatíd be a bit boring right now.

Do you have many CoEís in the work shop or do folk generally have a one CoE approach?
   
                                      ... Andy
   
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Andy Davies
garishglobes
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« Reply #51 on: January 10, 2014, 09:34:07 AM »

I think... that the P&T glass is probably (additionally, given the age, this is likely) really formulated for the furnace. It is possibly a more  concentrated colour than glass that would be used for flameworking, which makes it stiffer?

Bullseye, I believe, is formulated to 'run' quicker despite its slightly lower COE. I have however found some Bullseye colours to be difficult to work on a Hothead because of the flame atmosphere - pinks particularly are prone to greying. Bullseye rods can also be quite shocky, especially some of the opaques!

I'm sure there is a dichroic glass that is 104-compatible.

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JanieD
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« Reply #52 on: January 10, 2014, 10:00:42 AM »


Do you have many CoEís in the work shop or do folk generally have a one CoE approach?
   
                                      ... Andy
   


At the moment I have COE 104 glass (Effetre, CiM and Lauscha), Reichenbach COE 94(+/-2), Gaffer COE 96 and Boro rod for punties.
I make sure I keep them all labelled and separate though.


Jane
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hopejacare
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« Reply #53 on: January 10, 2014, 10:06:31 AM »

I bought some dichroic strips from Devardi in USA that is 104coe

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/321175609743?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649

I have diff manufacturers but all 104 coe rods (just a bit of frit that is diff coe's)

Cheers Claire x
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Andy Davies
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Posts: 58



« Reply #54 on: January 10, 2014, 10:08:25 AM »



At the moment I have COE 104 glass (Effetre, CiM and Lauscha), Reichenbach COE 94(+/-2), Gaffer COE 96 and Boro rod for punties.
I make sure I keep them all labelled and separate though.


Jane
[/quote]

      Hi Jane, all understood,  how to you find the difference in pliability between types of glass (or I guess to put it another way which is the quickest to melt) 

    Regards ... Andy
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Andy Davies
JanieD
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« Reply #55 on: January 10, 2014, 10:21:34 AM »

I don't notice that much difference between COE 96 and COE 104. I love the colours that Reichenbach and Gaffer produce, and as the frit I have is mostly COE 94/96 it means I don't have to worry about limiting the amount of it in a bead.
You can use COE 94/96 frit on a COE 104 bead, but you have to stick to 5% of frit on the bead's surface in case of incompatibility.

Gaffer Robin's Egg blue is one of my favourite colours. Caroline (Beadbug) sells this glass on her website - http://www.beadbug.co.uk/




Jane
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Nicknack
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Posts: 465

To bead, or not to bead? ..... stupid question!


« Reply #56 on: January 10, 2014, 11:04:20 AM »

You can get 104 Dichro, but it doesn't play nearly as nicely as the 90, and, to me, always looks disappointing.  Mind you, I do a lot of fusing with Bullseye and dichro.  I find it very difficult not to burn the 104 Dichro when making beads, but if I use the 90 Dichro with Bullseye rods it works much better.

Nick
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Pat from Canvey
Only a little bit odd
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Keep on blowing


« Reply #57 on: January 10, 2014, 12:50:42 PM »

I have all the 104 makes, plus Spectrum and Gaffer COE96, boro, bottle, and float. This bowl was made with cathedral stained glass.   and this is a float glass heart, and bottle glass,
I am a cheapskate and don't like to throw any glass away.
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Andy Davies
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Posts: 58



« Reply #58 on: January 10, 2014, 01:07:37 PM »

I have all the 104 makes, plus Spectrum and Gaffer COE96, boro, bottle, and float. This bowl was made with cathedral stained glass.
I am a cheapskate and don't like to throw any glass away.

OK Pat, I never throw much away, I get my inspiration from bits and pieces around me, at least that's my excuse.

     ... Andy   
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Andy Davies
michelle5181
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« Reply #59 on: July 11, 2019, 01:41:12 PM »

Hi there,

If you have glass that needs striking would you do it before or after if you want to encase it?

Many thanks,
Michelle

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