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Author Topic: Moretti Reactions  (Read 7900 times)
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Mary
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« on: March 16, 2007, 08:09:54 AM »

Not sure where to put this, it's not really a tutorial.  Huh

Okay, I've started a list of Moretti/Effetre colours that are reactive, and what they do. If you have any I've forgotten, please add them! Or more info on these colours, and pictures. Lets get as much info as possible!

264 Ivory Contains sulphur, and will react with metals. Creates dark lines round copper colours (turquoise, copper green). Reacts with pure silver and silver glass, marbled organic effects. Reacts with many frits.

276 Dark Ivory As ivory, but stronger reactions, the whole surface will often change rather than just outlines. If well heated on its own, it will create caramel web patterns, like aged china.

210 Avocado, 211 Sage will both have similar reactions to ivory.

218 Petroleum Green Over-heating causes interesting marbled effects. Prolonged heating will produce brick red. Reacts with ivory.

219 Copper Green Reacts with ivory. Metallic copper effects under reduction (removable with etching). Turns pink under certain conditions.

232, 236 Turquoise, 228 Sky Blue Copper colours, react with ivory. Brick red effects under reduction.

254 EDP Evil Devitrifying Purple. Devitrifies easily, going chalky and pitted. Reheat to glowing to remove this. Varies from magenta to pale lilac as you work it. Reacts with ivory. Can “swallow” other colours.

456 Rubino, Cranberry Contains gold. Striking colour. Don’t overheat or you’ll burn the colour out and not get it back. Lightly reduce for a golden lustre. Goes mucky grey on ivory, prettier reaction on opal yellow. Goes blue/green with silver, good for faux boro.

018 Trans Light Brown, 049 StrawYellow Both reactive. Dip in iris gold frit (Reichenbach) and add silver for faux boro effects.

266 Opal Yellow Different batches may be lighter or darker. Can be struck for blush pink tones.

223 Mosaic Green Weird stuff. Spreads and takes over.

066 Intense Black Stays black even pulled thin, when standard black looks purple. Webs amazingly when well heated, especially if applied in thin stringers.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2007, 08:34:51 AM by Mary » Logged
LesleyMac
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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2007, 07:16:20 PM »

The obvious one that springs to my mind is

261 - Light Silver plum - this gives a lovely metallic look if worked in a cool oxygen rich flame.
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Lesley
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LesleyMac
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« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2007, 02:26:29 AM »

Thought I would put a photo in here of the reaction between turquoise and ivory, as you can see when used together you end up with nice "lines" between the colours.  This is the easiest reaction to get as you cannot fail.

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Lesley
Everyone is gifted, its just that some leave the wrapping on longer than others
(Richard Wilkins)


My Etsy http://www.etsy.com/shop.php?user_id=5469196
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