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Author Topic: My Silver Glass Tips (long!)  (Read 10998 times)
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Mary
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« on: March 06, 2007, 10:13:46 AM »

A few people have been looking for silver-glass tips, so I thought Iíd tell you how I work them. I know this isnít the only way to get results, itís just how I do it, so please add your tips too! By the way, Iím on a Minor with one oxy-con.

Silver glass works because of the silver in it, the colours come from crystals forming. The size of the crystals affects the colour achieved. It can change the colour of the glass itself, but most of the effects come as it forms as a haze on the surface. Reducing brings the silver to the surface, then the crystals will grow at just below melting temps. If the glass gets too hot, the crystals melt and you lose the effects, which is not necessarily a bad thing, because you can start again if you donít like it!

For iridescent surface effects I apply the glass and shape the bead in a normal flame. When I am finished shaping, I let the bead cool till the glow has gone. This is important, I can't get effects on a glowing hot bead. Then I turn up the propane till I have a big flame thatís mostly yellow, but still blue at the tip (an all yellow flame will soot up the bead). I hold the bead out at the tip of this flame for a few seconds. Take it out the flame, have a look, then repeat if you want, basically like reduction glass. Remember, if the bead gets too hot the colours will just disappear, but you can cool it and start again. This is especially good with Gaia, Nyx, Kronos 2, Aion, Picasso but it works for others too.

Blue/green hazy effects. After getting the iridescent effect, you can continue to grow the crystals for the stronger opaque colours. I reduce as above, then cool the bead and gently rewarm in a normal flame, as if I was striking it, repeating several times. Take your time, slow down, and watch for the haze, you donít want to burn it off. If you are not getting enough effect, reduce it again, to bring more silver to the surface, then go back to striking it. Or let your bead cool more between stages. This is especially good with Kronos, Nyx, Aion, Picasso, da Vinci, but try it with others too.

Swirls of colour. I like to use a different method with Elektra, Supernova, and for getting amber colours in Aion and da Vinci. I turn up the propane at the start, but just enough that there is a little yellow in the flame (if you turn it up too much the glass will get sooty). I work the glass in the middle blue part of the flame, not right out at the tip (Elektra seems to bubble and pit less when the propane is turned up like this). As I apply the glass, the haze is forming and being trapped in the glass for swirls of colour. You can also fold and twist the end of the rod in the flame for stronger colours, before applying it or pulling stringer.

Van Gogh is different, it goes caramel in a reduction flame. Kimberly Affleck gave great tips for this one on LE. She gets it HOT so it goes transparent, then heats and cools it to get the colours, not unlike raku. I mostly get dark blue/purple with this one.

Da Vinci 2 is different again. I work it in a neutral flame, handling it lightly. I get colour as soon as it melts, so I just work it quickly. It goes grey if I work it too long.

Encasing seems to slow or halt the crystal growth, so I get the effect I like before encasing. Try to heat just the clear as you shape the encasing, if the silver glass core gets really hot the effects will either intensify or disappear.

Reactive glass. Another thing to consider is the glass you use as a base. Black and cobalt are ďsilver repellingĒ, so will appear to drive the crystals to the surface for good effects. Ivory and rubino react with silver, so you donít necessarily need to do anything special to silver glass on these. Try Aion or da Vinvi on either for interesting effects.


Now, over to you! Add your tips and comments!
« Last Edit: March 06, 2007, 11:16:55 AM by Mary » Logged
glassworks
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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2007, 10:27:52 AM »

mary, you are a legend!!!

 Grin Grin Grin Grin
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Mary
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« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2007, 10:40:51 AM »


 Grin Blush!
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Billie
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« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2007, 10:52:35 AM »

Thanks for sharing Mary.  I can't wait to give this a go.  Will hopefully post some results next week... I'm moving onto a big girls torch Sunday, thanks muchly to Q and Griet  Grin
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LesleyMac
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« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2007, 11:18:46 AM »

Excellent Mary, really useful tips, will be trying these at the weekend.  I have been managing to get some good effects with Gaia but find it frustrating sometimes when using for example Silver plum stringer on top which needs a cool oxygen and then you lose the effect you have spent so long getting on the Gaia.
There is a lot to be learned about these glasses and its great that people share. Grin

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Lesley
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BeadyBugs
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« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2007, 03:22:01 PM »

That's fantastic Mary - thanks for sharing.  I've got some lovely glasses that need to be experimented with, just not the patience required to go with them. Grin

HP x
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Helen P
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« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2007, 03:58:03 PM »

Thanks Mary - invaluable!
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Mary
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« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2007, 04:55:28 PM »

Come on people, tell us what you do differently!
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BeadyBugs
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« Reply #8 on: March 06, 2007, 05:00:20 PM »

I usually try wafting, striking and reducing - get it wrong and go, oh look...another plain blue bead. Grin

Then go and dribble over pics of yours instead!  LOL! Grin

HP x
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Helen P
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« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2007, 05:09:03 PM »

what fab tips mary i will have a practice tomorow sooz gave me some nxy but i dont have any of the others yet theres so many diffrent types i cant keep up
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Bee
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« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2007, 09:46:42 AM »

Wow! This is great! I hope you don't mind but I've printed off a copy to put in my 'Techniques' scrapbook.
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Mary
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« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2007, 10:07:43 AM »

That's what it's for!
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beadysam
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« Reply #12 on: March 29, 2007, 10:14:30 AM »

Hey Mary, the silver shorts I'm STILL waiting on, left UK customs yesterday morning, so I'm hoping your tips will come in handy!

SAM xx
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beadysam
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« Reply #13 on: April 03, 2007, 06:53:17 AM »

Ooh, I got the customs letter yesterday so my glass should be delivered today - hopefully! Roll Eyes
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Buzzybead
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« Reply #14 on: April 03, 2007, 07:07:13 AM »

I usually try wafting, striking and reducing - get it wrong and go, oh look...another plain blue bead. Grin

Then go and dribble over pics of yours instead!  LOL! Grin

HP x


Hehehe - that's what I do too, although I have to say that the pooh brown colour I can achieve with DaVinci is a joy to behold...not!
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