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 91 
 on: January 27, 2020, 06:23:48 PM 
Started by sanje48 - Last post by sanje48
Thanks for that. Iíll try and get in touch with her😊

 92 
 on: January 27, 2020, 02:26:14 PM 
Started by sanje48 - Last post by Nicknack
I think there was someone on Facebook, EU Lampwork Supplies/destash, who wanted an extraction set up. Heather Johnson, replied on Lizzie Provis's post today.

 93 
 on: January 27, 2020, 01:46:35 PM 
Started by sanje48 - Last post by sanje48
hi,
I have a Systemair RVK 200E2 - L1 20 cm (8") extractor fan for sale.
It has never been used as when I moved to Italy I bought a smaller one there which was better suited to my needs in the studio.
If anyone is interested it costs between £94 and £99 new and I would sell it for £50 o.n.o. The fan is in Ipswich, Suffolk and would need to be collected as its quite heavy and a bit too big to post.
thanks

 94 
 on: January 27, 2020, 01:45:26 PM 
Started by sanje48 - Last post by sanje48
hi,
I have a Systemair RVK 200E2 - L1  20 cm (8") extractor fan for sale.
It has never been used as when I moved to Italy I bought a smaller one there which was better suited to my needs in the studio.
If anyone is interested it costs between £94 and £99 new and I would sell it for £50 o.n.o. The fan is in Ipswich, Suffolk and would need to be collected as its quite heavy and a bit too big to post.
thanks

 95 
 on: January 18, 2020, 07:51:17 AM 
Started by DementedMagpie - Last post by Dietmar
...
and of course PPP = practice practice practice
I translate pPp a little different: practice, patience, practice.
The "patience" means not to practice without looking what you do.

If you want to become perfect you have to practice, but you have to practice PERFECTION.

 96 
 on: December 16, 2019, 06:48:45 PM 
Started by Moira HFG - Last post by Moira HFG
Hello Dietmar, thanks for your suggestions.

In the end I decided to paint the pattern in tracing black, the sort used in stained glass painting. It took a fine brush and a lot of patience, but they came out fine.

 97 
 on: December 14, 2019, 01:13:18 PM 
Started by Moira HFG - Last post by Dietmar
There are several other ways to get the image into the surface of dichroic glass. There is the option of laser engraving the glass surface. If that does not work try to laser engrave an etching resist on the glass (and etch later).


A total different way to small and complicated images is making a murrini cane. There are many ways to do, but most of them include lampwork or require a glory hole.

- Classic lampwork cane: Find a large central part of the pattern and shape a glass rod like this. Paint the other parts layer by layer on the sides of the starting shape. Finally put caps of clear on the ends, heat and pull to thr required diameter.

- Complex lampwork cane: Make details of the final image in contributing canes and pull them thinner. Cut them into sections of about 5cm and reheat them before combining them into a more detailled image. Repeat reducing the diameter and combining more parts untill the final image is complete.

- Mosaic cane: Bundle fine sections of colored rods (stringers) in a way that the image is visible in the end of the bundle. Use copper ore iron wire for bundeling and hest in the kiln to tack fuse temperature of the glass. Pic it up with a blob of clear glass on a punty and secure the front edge against falling apart. Heat the bundle from one end to the other to squeeze the trapped air out, add a second punty, heat and pull to the required diameter. You can combine premade canes with solid rods (stringers) for more complex images.


Dietmar

 98 
 on: December 14, 2019, 12:28:20 PM 
Started by Moira HFG - Last post by Dietmar
You might have to reduce tha glass much slighter than you did. This glass might contain lead in the glass matrix, that reduces to a dark silver (like haematite). Just turn gas up to "dragon-breath" and go quickly several times through the tail end of the flame. Watch the bead as the gold comes up.


Dietmaer

 99 
 on: December 14, 2019, 12:23:46 PM 
Started by flame n fuse - Last post by Dietmar
I've seen hollow beads, tumbled in a bed of short pices of stainless steel wire. The beads were frosted nicely. But the holes "swallowed" several of these wires per bead. The removal of those wires was a pain in the ... (your imagination). Most of those beads kept the wires forever.

If there are particles of shot stuck in beadholes, try an ultrasonic cleaning bath. The ultrasound wiggles much more than any other tool. Between the shot and the hole there are additional particles of your abrasive. They are the "ones" that clog the gap between shot and bead. With those vibrations the whole material gets in motion and the abrasive might move out or break into smaller particles.


Dietmar

 100 
 on: October 26, 2019, 07:42:02 AM 
Started by Flowers - Last post by Zeldazog

Quote
So kiln carving should be done on a full fuse rather than a slump setting?

Well, you can do it on any setting you like, but the hotter you go, the more definition you will get.  There's another Bullseye tipsheet about kiln carving, and you can see the sort of detail on that, they recommend at least full fuse.

Quote
And basically slumping is the very final stage of a piece?
Because slumping is the lowest temperature process, yes - when planning on making a piece that might have several stages and different process temperatures, you have to consider what temperature each will be and design your work in that order.

Quote
Also what exactly is a fire polish?   Smiley
Fire polishing is taking the glass hot enough for the surface to melt slightly, so that it softens and smoothes.


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